COVID-19 FAQs

Symptom Checker

For those of you who are curious about your symptoms but aren’t sure they warrant a trip to the doctor, we have a helpful new option for you. The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) has developed an online symptom checker.

This is a useful and reliable tool that walks you through some simple questions and then gives you a set of next steps based on your answers. Some of the questions it will ask you:

  • Whether or not you are currently ill
  • What state you live in
  • Your age range and gender
  • Whether you have been in contact with someone who has COVID-19, or have you traveled overseas recently?
  • What kinds of symptoms you are experiencing
  • Whether you have a chronic health problem

This tool is free and easy to use and asks questions in a non-invasive way. Find it here:

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Here are our answers to our patients’ and community members’ frequently asked questions about Coronavirus for general guidance and informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your provider or dial 911.

Scheduling

1. Are you open for appointments?

Yes, we are open and are taking appointments.

We have options for an in-person visit (with special protocols in place), car visit, and telephone visit. Please view our Advisory Page for the protocols we have in place to protect our patients and staff.

Please look for an update from us about our virtual visit option in the next few days as we roll this out to all patients. Thank you!

2. Is it safe to come in for an appointment? I need a prescription refilled.

If you have a scheduled appointment at our clinics, and would prefer a telehealth/telephone visit instead:

  • Please inform us at the time of scheduling that you want your appointment to be a telephone visit instead.
  • At the time of your appointment, if it is scheduled as a telephone/telehealth visit, your provider will call you.

For prescription-refill requests:

  • Prescription-refill appointments can often be done through a telephone visit. Please inform us at the time of scheduling that your purpose is for prescription-refills and you want this to be scheduled as a telephone visit.
  • Please note that some prescriptions may require an in-person visit or lab work. Your provider will have additional directions during your telephone visit should lab work will be needed.

This information is current as of 3/27/20.

3. Should I reschedule my annual physical?

No, there is no need to reschedule. Our staff are highly trained. We have established protocols for identifying, isolating, and caring for patients with contagious diseases.

We have special protocols in place for in person visits to protect patients and staff.

Please also look for an update coming from us in the next few days about telehealth options we are offering.

4. I need to get blood work done, is it safe to do so?

Our staff are highly trained. We have established protocols for identifying, isolating, and caring for patients with contagious diseases.

To maintain social distancing and safety, we offer additional services due to current circumstances:

  • When you visit our locations, you will be pre-screened at the door.
  • Depending on the type of care needed, we accommodate your visit/appointment through a car visit, or a telephone visit.

Walk-in Clinic Visits and Scheduled Appointments at our Clinics:

  • We are pre-screening our patients at the door to protect our patients and staff.
  • On our doors, you will find our Front Desk back line for the particular location you are visiting. Please call that number to check-in for your visit and our staff will pre-screen you over the phone.
  • After checking in and being pre-screened, please wait in your car.
  • Depending on your care concern, your visit may be switched to a car visit where your provider will come out to your car, or a telephone visit, where your provider will call you.
  • If your provider determines your visit/appointment should still occur in an exam room, you will only be called when the exam room is ready for you. There is no need to wait in our waiting room/lobby.
  • Please know that we sanitize and disinfect every exam room after every patient visit, and our waiting room/lobby every hour.

4. Do you have virtual visit options?

Yes, we do. As of week of March 23, 2020, we piloted virtual video visits to select group of appointments. Please look for an update coming from us in the next few days as we roll this out to all patients. Thank you!

5. I’d like to see my doctor about a non COVID-19 issue, are you still taking appointments?  Is it safe to go to the office?

Yes, we are open and are taking appointments. If your visit needs to be an in-person visit, please know that we have special protocols in place and our staff is highly trained with identifying, isolating, and caring for patients with contagious diseases. You can learn more about our protocol via our Advisory Page.

We are also piloting a virtual visit option. Please look for an update coming from us in the next few these as we roll this out to all patients.

Protocols

1. What are your protocols to protect patients and staff?

Please view our Advisory Page for our clinic protocols, care options for car visit and telephone visits.

Please look for an update from us in the next view days about our virtual care/video visits options. Thank you!

Symptoms

1. What are all of the symptoms of COVID-19?

According to the CDC, there are 3 main symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Cough
  • Fever
  • Shortness of breath

These symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html accessed 3/24/20 12:01

2. I heard there were additional symptoms. What are they, and what’s the progression of symptoms?

To date, the CDC is still referring to the following as symptoms of COVID-19.

  • Cough
  • Fever
  • Shortness of breath

If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html accessed 3/24/20 12:01

3. What fever temperature should we be watching out for? 

A temperature of 100.4 F is considered a fever.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html accessed 3/24/20 16:43

4. Is coronavirus worse than the flu?

According to the World Health Organization, COVID-19 causes more severe disease than seasonal influenza. While many people globally have built up immunity to seasonal flu strains, COVID-19 is a new virus to which no one has immunity. That means more people are susceptible to infection, and some will suffer severe disease.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html accessed 3/24/20 16:45

5. Is there any way to know if I have already have the virus and recovered? If you have the virus once, can you still get it again?

There is not enough research yet to know this. The best way to prevent is to limit potential exposure to coronavirus, wash your hands frequently, avoid touching your face with unwashed hands, and practice social distancing.

6. I care for an elder with congestive heart failure and related breathing issues. At what point symptom-wise, would a person in that condition call a doctor?

The symptoms for COVID-19 are as follows:

  • Cough
  • Fever
  • Shortness of breath

If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html accessed 3/24/20 12:01

7. How do I know when to see a doctor?

Please contact your medical provider if you are concerned of potentially having COVID-19 and have all three symptoms present:

  • Cough
  • Fever
  • Shortness of breath

If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html accessed 3/24/20 12:01

8. What is the difference between coronavirus, flu, cold, and seasonal allergies?

The symptoms for each are as follows:

9. What should we watch out for babies and children?

Symptoms in Pediatric Patients

Illness among pediatric cases appear to be mild, with most cases presenting with:

  • symptoms of respiratory infection
  • cough
  • nasal congestion
  • rhinorrhea
  • sore throat

Signs and symptoms of COVID-19 in children may be similar to those for common viral respiratory infections or other childhood illnesses. It is important for pediatric providers to have an appropriate suspicion of COVID-19, but also to continue to consider and test for other diagnoses, such as influenza (see CDC’s Flu Information for Healthcare Professionals for more information).

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/pediatric-hcp.html accessed 3/24/20 08:23

Precautions

1. What can we eat/drink to prevent coronavirus, or to recover quicker?

The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person, between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet). It is transferred through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html accessed 3/24/20 17:24

2. I am working from home, only do grocery shopping when needed, and maintain “social distancing”.  I’m also older. Am I taking the proper precautions?

The CDC recommends that you stay home whenever possible. Older age is considered high-risk. Washing hands frequently with soap and water, disinfecting surfaces, and maintain social distance are the best ways to protect yourself if you have to go out.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/prevention.html accessed 3/25/20 13:24

3. As I deliver mail, I am curious how long it lives on the surfaces I transport. Am I greater risk? Should I be stripping down when I get home and throwing everything in the wash?

In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely very low risk of spread from products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks at ambient temperatures. Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread most often by respiratory droplets. Currently there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with imported goods and there have not been any cases of COVID-19 in the United States associated with imported goods.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html#anchor_1584386215012 accessed 3/25/20 13:55

4. What precautions should I be taking when I am in the grocery store? Is there anything else I should be doing besides washing my hands when I get home?

Maintain a six-foot distance from others. Don’t touch your face, wash hands thoroughly with soapy water.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/prevention.html accessed 3/25/20 13:58

5. My husband is on immunosuppressants for a transplant. What do I do if he gets sick? If I do?  He’s remaining home until further notice. I’m only leaving for essentials.

Stay home unless absolutely necessary. Wash hands frequently with soap and water, wipe down surfaces frequently. If he starts showing symptoms, call your provider immediately.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/specific-groups/get-ready.html accessed 3/25/20 13:58

6. When should we start to worry?  These symptoms mimic the flu and its flu season so are what point do we contact our doctor?  I’ve heard that point is if you feel out-of-breath, but the flu does that to me as well.

If you develop emergency warning signs get help immediately. Those include: trouble breathing, persistent pain in the chest, confusion or inability to arouse, bluish lips or face.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html accessed 3/25/20 14:02

7. If we had contact with someone that develops symptoms a few days later but is not eligible for testing, what are the quarantine recommendations?

The virus that causes COVID-19 is spreading from person-to-person. Someone who is actively sick with COVID-19 can spread the illness to others. That is why CDC recommends that these patients be isolated either in the hospital or at home (depending on how sick they are) until they are better and no longer pose a risk of infecting others.

How long someone is actively sick can vary so the decision on when to release someone from isolation is made on a case-by-case basis in consultation with doctors, infection prevention and control experts, and public health officials and involves considering specifics of each situation including disease severity, illness signs and symptoms, and results of laboratory testing for that patient.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html#anchor_1584386215012 accessed 3/25/20 14:03

8. What is the criteria to be considered “high-risk” for COVID-19?

According to the CDC, these are considered high-risk:

  • People aged 65 years and older
  • People who live in a nursing home or long-term care facility
  • Other high-risk conditions could include:
    • People with chronic lung disease or moderate to severe asthma
    • People who have heart disease with complications
    • People who are immunocompromised including cancer treatment
    • People of any age with severe obesity (body mass index (BMI)≥40) or certain underlying medical conditions(particularly if not well controlled) such as those with diabetes, renal failure, or liver disease might also be at risk
  • People who are pregnant should be monitored since they are known to be at risk with severe viral illness, however, to date data on COVID-19 has not shown increased risk

Many conditions can cause a person to be immunocompromised, including cancer treatment, bone marrow or organ transplantation, immune deficiencies, poorly controlled HIV or AIDS, and prolonged use of corticosteroids and other immune weakening medications.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/faq.html accessed 3/26/20 9:44

9. Am I okay to go to work if I have elderly people at home?

Continue to practice everyday preventive actions: 6 feet distance, handwashing, frequent sanitizing of highly used surfaces.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/prevention.html accessed 3/25/20 14:22

10. As an immune compromised person, with a husband that works outside of the home on a daily basis, what extra precautions should we be taking besides frequent hand washing?

If you are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, you should: take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others; when you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick; limit close contact and wash your hands often; and avoid crowds, cruise travel, and non-essential travel. If there is an outbreak in your community, stay home as much as possible. Watch for symptoms and emergency signs. If you get sick, stay home and call your doctor.

Source: What should high risk people do https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html#anchor_1584386949645  accessed 3/25/20 14:06

11. Since the virus can stay potent on various surface types for hours or days, should we be sanitizing purchased grocery packaging (for example) if we are higher risk individuals?

In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely very low risk of spread from products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks at ambient temperatures. Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread most often by respiratory droplets. Currently there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with imported goods and there have not been any cases of COVID-19 in the United States associated with imported goods.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html#anchor_1584386215012 3/25/20 14:07

12. How dangerous is it for seniors to go to grocery store, pharmacy, etc.? What are best practices?

Maintain a six-foot distance from others. Don’t touch your face, wash hands thoroughly with soapy water.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/prevention.html 3/25/20 14:08

13. Should caregivers still be working?

Continue to practice every day preventive actions.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/prevention.html 3/25/20 14:18

Masks

1. Do the face masks help if worn in public?

Only wear a face mask if you are sick.

If you are sick: You should wear a face mask when you are around other people and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office.

If you are caring for others: If the person who is sick is not able to wear a face mask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then people who live in the home should stay in a different room. When caregivers enter the room of the sick person, they should wear a face mask.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html accessed 3/24/20 9:55

2. Do homemade masks really work and is it worth the effort making them?

Orders for standard/disposable masks are on long back-orders due to demand.

Homemade masks are useful to prevent spreading germs from coughing, etc.

The CDC recommends it to be used as last resort. It is not useful for COVID-19.

In settings where face masks are not available, one might use homemade masks (e.g., bandana, scarf) for care of patients with COVID-19 as a last resort. However, homemade masks are not considered PPE, since their capability to protect is unknown. Caution should be exercised when considering this option.

Homemade masks should ideally be used in combination with a face shield that covers the entire front (that extends to the chin or below) and sides of the face.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/ppe-strategy/face-masks.html accessed 3/25/20 12:16

Clinical

1. If you have had both your pneumonia shots does that help if you get the virus?

Bacterial pneumonia is a secondary infection. People get COVID-19, then get sick again afterwards – there may be some protection for the second pneumonia but the vaccine may not necessarily provide immunity. Pay attention to symptoms and seek help. This shot is helpful for secondary infection.

According to the CDC, there is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus, which spreads mainly from person-to-person between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/prevention.html 03/25/2020 08:33

2. If you have mild symptoms (coughing, fever, etc.) but not severe enough to be hospitalized (and therefore not obtaining a test for COVID19), what is the recommended timeline for self-quarantine?

If you self-manage and don’t test: 2 weeks from the beginning of symptoms. If somebody has contact with others, encourage isolation from other family members in home. If no vulnerability, you can ride it out together. If you are observing extended quarantine, 2 weeks after no symptoms present. If you have mild symptoms, 2-week isolation. Practicing good hygiene – hand washing, using hand sanitizer, wiping down surfaces will make your family a little safer.

3. How long can you be a carrier for the virus before you start showing symptoms? 

Quarantine means separating a person or group of people who have been exposed to a contagious disease but have not developed symptoms from others who have not been exposed, in order to prevent the possible spread of that disease. Quarantine is usually established for the incubation period of the communicable disease, which is the span of time during which people have developed illness after exposure. For COVID-19, the period of quarantine is 14 days from the last date of exposure, because 14 days is the longest incubation period seen for similar coronaviruses. Someone who has been released from COVID-19 quarantine is not considered a risk for spreading the virus to others because they have not developed illness during the incubation period.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html#anchor_1584386215012 03/25/2020 13:32

4. Does a dry cough, no fever a cause for concern?

Not everyone needs to be tested for COVID-19. Most people have mild illness and are able to recover at home. CDC has guidance for who should be tested, but decisions about testing are at the discretion of state and local health departments and/or individual clinicians.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/testing.html  03/25/2020 13:50

5. We’re pretty sure our adult daughter and her husband have COVID-19 because they were exposed to their neighbor who tested positive. They’re experiencing symptoms of chest congestion and fatigue, but seem to be feeling better today. They have 2 girls who aren’t displaying symptoms. How long should my husband and I wait to visit them after all their symptoms are gone?

People with COVID-19 who have stayed home (home isolated) can stop home isolation under the following conditions:

If you will not have a test to determine if you are still contagious, you can leave home after these three things have happened:

  • You have had no fever for at least 72 hours (that is three full days of no fever without the use medicine that reduces fevers)
  • AND other symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough or shortness of breath have improved)
  • AND at least 7 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared.

If you will be tested to determine if you are still contagious, you can leave home after these three things have happened:

  • You no longer have a fever (without the use medicine that reduces fevers)
  • AND other symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough or shortness of breath have improved)
  • AND you received two negative tests in a row, 24 hours apart.

Your doctor will follow CDC guidelines.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/if-you-are-sick/steps-when-sick.html 03/25/20 13:37

6. Is it safe to take ibuprofen to treat symptoms of COVID-19?

Some French doctors advise against using ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, many generic versions) for COVID-19 symptoms based on reports of otherwise healthy people with confirmed COVID-19 who were taking an NSAID for symptom relief and developed a severe illness, especially pneumonia. These are only observations and not based on scientific studies.

The WHO initially recommended using acetaminophen instead of ibuprofen to help reduce fever and aches and pains related to this coronavirus infection, but now states that either acetaminophen or ibuprofen can be used. Rapid changes in recommendations create uncertainty. Since some doctors remain concerned about NSAIDs, it still seems prudent to choose acetaminophen first, with a total dose not exceeding 3,000 milligrams per day.

However, if you suspect or know you have COVID-19 and cannot take acetaminophen, or have taken the maximum dose and still need symptom relief, taking over-the-counter ibuprofen does not need to be specifically avoided.

Source: https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/coronavirus-resource-center 03/25/2020 09:08

7. What are all of the lesser known underlying conditions that classify a person as vulnerable?

Living in a nursing or assisted living facility, any chronic lung disease or moderate to severe asthma, those with heart conditions, the immunocompromised, including those with cancer, severe obesity, diabetes, renal failure or liver disease.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/specific-groups/people-at-higher-risk.html 03/25/2020 13:43

8. If you get infected with the virus, can you get re-infected?

There is not enough data to conclusively say whether or not you can get the virus more than once.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/specific-groups/people-at-higher-risk.html 03/25/2020 13:43

9. How does it affect people with asthma?

COVID-19 can affect your respiratory tract (nose, throat, lungs), cause an asthma attack, and possibly lead to pneumonia and acute respiratory disease.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/specific-groups/asthma.html 03/25/2020 13:44

10. Could I have it if I showed the symptoms, including glass opacity in my lungs and a drop in potassium but the test came back negative? 2

Unfortunately, false negatives are possible.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/Factsheet-for-Patients-2019-nCoV.pdf 3/25/20 13:44

General

1. How serious is this outbreak?

The WHO (World Health Organization) declared coronavirus as a pandemic on March 11, 2020.

Source: https://www.who.int/dg/speeches/detail/who-director-general-s-opening-remarks-at-the-media-briefing-on-covid-19—11-march-2020 03/25/2020 08:54

2. I have heard several times on the news by doctors that EVERYONE should be tested. Is this true?

We follow clinical criteria guidelines provided by the CDC. There is limited availability for testing in our county.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/clinical-criteria.html 03/24/2020 09:03

3. If you get tested for it why do results take so long?  

It has to do with the bandwidth of laboratories — currently our lab partner may take 8 to 10 days before results are released due to capacity.

4.  I heard that the virus lives in the air for 3 hours; does it then land on items such as countertops and cardboard or do those surfaces need to be touch be someone to be considered contagious? 

In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely very low risk of spread from products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks at ambient temperatures. Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread most often by respiratory droplets. Currently there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with imported goods and there have not been any cases of COVID-19 in the United States associated with imported goods.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html#anchor_1584386215012 3/25/20 14:07

5. Approximately how long will the threat of this virus continue?  When will restrictions of socializing and travel end?

Look for updates from Governor Inslee for the state of Washington.

Source: https://www.governor.wa.gov/ 03/24/20 09:14

6. There’s a rumor that the virus dies above 77’  Fahrenheit, true or false ?

Generally coronaviruses survive for shorter periods of time at higher temperatures and higher humidity than in cooler or dryer environments. However, we don’t have direct data for this virus, nor do we have direct data for a temperature-based cutoff for inactivation at this point. The necessary temperature would also be based on the materials of the surface, the environment, etc. Regardless of temperature please follow CDC’s guidance for cleaning and disinfection.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html#anchor_1584386215012 03/24/2020 16:40

7. When is it safe to be around someone who has recovered? How long does a person continue to be contagious?

For Persons with COVID-19 Under Home Isolation:

The decision to discontinue home isolation should be made in the context of local circumstances. Options now include both 1) a time-since-illness-onset and time-since-recovery (non-test-based) strategy, and 2) a test-based strategy.

Time-since-illness-onset and time-since-recovery strategy (non-test-based strategy)*

Persons with COVID-19 who have symptoms and were directed to care for themselves at home may discontinue home isolation under the following conditions:

  • At least 3 days (72 hours) have passed since recovery defined as resolution of fever without the use of fever-reducing medications and improvement in respiratory symptoms (e.g., cough, shortness of breath); and,
  • At least 7 days have passed since symptoms first appeared.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/if-you-are-sick/steps-when-sick.html 03/24/2020 09:34

8. If I get it, how long will I be sick?

It depends on health history, but please monitor for symptoms that require emergency care:

If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include*:

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse

Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/if-you-are-sick/steps-when-sick.html 03/24/2020 09:55

9. How many times can a person contract the virus? If you get it, can you get it a second time?

The immune response to COVID-19 is not yet understood. Patients with MERS-CoV infection are unlikely to be re-infected shortly after they recover, but it is not yet known whether similar immune protection will be observed for patients with COVID-19.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/faq.html 3/26/20

10. Is it ok to be close to your indoor and outdoor pets? 

In the United States, there is no evidence to suggest that any animals, including pets, livestock, or wildlife, might be a source of COVID-19 infection at this time. However, because all animals can carry germs that can make people sick, it’s always a good idea to practice healthy habits around pets and other animals.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/animals.html 03/25/20 12:01

Testing

1. When will SFM be able to test us, the general population?  

The availability of tests are limited. We follow CDC guidelines for testing in which all symptoms must be present for testing to occur.

2. If I have all the symptoms of COVID-19 what are the exact steps that I should take for testing? Are you testing at the SFM locations?

Call us first. When you arrive for your appointment, follow directions at door upon arrival for our pre-screening protocol. A provider will determine if testing is needed and you will be referred to our location that does the test.

3. What to do if you think you already had COVID-19? Should I be tested?

Self-isolate, see doctor if condition worsens. Get care immediately if emergency symptoms are present

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/if-you-are-sick/steps-when-sick.html 03/24/2020 09:34

4. You shared that all of the people you tested came back negative but how many have you tested?

We shared back in March 20, 2020 that at the time, all of the tests we conducted were negative. We had tested 42 at the time.

As of March 26, 2020, we have completed over 366 tests, and 220 results have been received. To date, we have seen 5 positive tests. This is consistent with what the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department is reporting.

We are seeing an 8 to 10 day turnaround with our laboratory partner.

 5. Based on my symptoms back in November through January, I think I already had COVID-19. If so, would I now have the antibodies? Also, when could I get tested to know? 

There is not enough research right now to know if having COVID-19 once gives you future immunity. Also, there is no blood test that tells us if someone has had COVID-19 in the past. It is possible for all tests to provide false negatives, do not assume that what they had earlier this year was COVID-19.

 6. When a COVID-19 test has been done, how long does it take to get the results? 

Laboratories are backlogged and we are receiving test results between 8 to 10 days.

7. I was sent in for COVID-19 test on Friday the 20th because of symptoms. When should I consider further medical help? I am still sick.

If your condition is worsening, please contact us.

For Pregnant Patients

1. What are the risks for pregnant women regarding COVID-19?

From the CDC:

COVID-19 is a new disease and we are still learning how it spreads, the severity of illness it causes, and to what extent it may spread in the United States

We do not currently know if pregnant women have a greater chance of getting sick from COVID-19 than the general public nor whether they are more likely to have serious illness as a result. Pregnant women experience changes in their bodies that may increase their risk of some infections. With viruses from the same family as COVID-19, and other viral respiratory infections, such as influenza, women have had a higher risk of developing severe illness. It is always important for pregnant women to protect themselves from illnesses.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/pregnancy-breastfeeding.html 3/24/20 11:38

 2. Due to COVID-19, I have seen more articles about no one being allowed in the hospital room with me during labor & Delivery.  Is this the case here as well for Good Samaritan?

For updated visitor policy, please visit https://www.multicare.org/womens-care-pregnancy-birth-puyallup/ or call 253-697-5300.

 3. Will my prenatal appointments continue as scheduled?

Yes, we need to ensure both you and baby are getting the prenatal care you need. We have special protocols in place to protect patients and staff.

We have also piloted virtual video visits and will be rolling out to all soon. Please look for an update from us with specific guidelines for maternity patients and how we can accommodate your care.

 

 

Please visit our Advisory Page for more information about our protocols to protect patients and staff.

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